9 Feb

The Nature Conservancy: Building partnerships to conserve land and water, protect nature, and preserve life

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The Nature Conservancy is the leading conservation organization working around the world to protect ecologically important lands and waters for nature and people. The non-profit organization (founded in 1951) addresses the most pressing conservation threats at the largest scale. The Nature Conservancy’s mission is to conserve the lands and waters on which all life depends and their vision is a world where the diversity of life thrives, and people act to conserve nature for its own sake and its ability to fulfill our needs and enrich our lives.

The Nature Conservancy achieves their mission and vision through the efforts of a diverse staff of more than 600 scientists and with the help of their many partners including governmental agencies, companies, non-profit organizations, and local stakeholders to pursue non-confrontational, pragmatic, market-based solutions to conservation challenges. In this spotlight, we would like to highlight the important role of non-profit and company collaborations to raise awareness of issues and support new science and projects that effectively help to create change in practice and policy.

Recently, The Nature Conservancy has partnered with DroneDeploy (a cloud-based software company that enables simple and reliable drone operations) on the Phones and Drones project aimed at empowering citizen scientists to help monitor the effects of El Niño on the California coastline. With the help of DroneDeploy’s image processing and map hosting, the Phones and Drones project allows regular citizens to transform themselves into citizen scientists by using technology that’s already at their fingertips- phones and drones- to contribute in creating a crowd-sourced aerial map of the California coast!

phones and drones

This recent partnership between The Nature Conservancy and DroneDeploy will empower local citizens to capture accurate aerial imagery of high water or flooding, coastal erosion, and storm damage that will be processed into high-resolution orthomosaic maps, digital surface models and 3D models along California’s 840 miles of coastline. DroneDeploy’s software will allow drone-owning citizens who participate in the Phones and Drones project to easily process their geotagged imagery for free, which will enable the project to create a pieced-together map that will document the impacts of big storm events cause by what could be one of the largest El Niño’s on record.

The impacts of El Niño are likely to cause significant impacts to both natural ecosystems and human systems in California. Therefore, The Nature Conservancy will make use of the crowd-sourced data to ground-truth their climate models to get an accurate, statewide picture of how sea level rise, flooding and erosion are shaping our coastline and to establish the best ways in which we can conserve California’s coastline.

According to DroneDeploy, citizens can take pictures with their phone and share their photos online by tagging

The Nature Conservancy is the leading conservation organization working around the world to protect ecologically important lands and waters for nature and people. The non-profit organization (founded in 1951) addresses the most pressing conservation threats at the largest scale. The Nature Conservancy’s mission is to conserve the lands and waters on which all life depends and their vision is a world where the diversity of life thrives, and people act to conserve nature for its own sake and its ability to fulfill our needs and enrich our lives. The Nature Conservancy achieves their mission and vision through the efforts of a diverse staff of more than 600 scientists and with the help of their many partners including governmental agencies, companies, non-profit organizations, and local stakeholders to pursue non-confrontational, pragmatic, market-based solutions to conservation challenges. In this spotlight, we would like to highlight the important role of non-profit and company collaborations to raise awareness of issues and support new science and projects that effectively help to create change in practice and policy.

 

Recently, The Nature Conservancy has partnered with DroneDeploy (a cloud-based software company that enables simple and reliable drone operations) on the Phones and Drones project aimed at empowering citizen scientists to help monitor the effects of El Niño on the California coastline. With the help of DroneDeploy’s image processing and map hosting, the Phones and Drones project allows regular citizens to transform themselves into citizen scientists by using technology that’s already at their fingertips- phones and drones- to contribute in creating a crowd-sourced aerial map of the California coast!

 

This recent partnership between The Nature Conservancy and DroneDeploy will empower local citizens to capture accurate aerial imagery of high water or flooding, coastal erosion, and storm damage that will be processed into high-resolution orthomosaic maps, digital surface models and 3D models along California’s 840 miles of coastline. DroneDeploy’s software will allow drone-owning citizens who participate in the Phones and Drones project to easily process their geotagged imagery for free, which will enable the project to create a pieced-together map that will document the impacts of big storm events cause by what could be one of the largest El Niño’s on record.

The impacts of El Niño are likely to cause significant impacts to both natural ecosystems and human systems in California. Therefore, The Nature Conservancy will make use of the crowd-sourced data to ground-truth their climate models to get an accurate, statewide picture of how sea level rise, flooding and erosion are shaping our coastline and to establish the best ways in which we can conserve California’s coastline.

According to DroneDeploy, citizens can take pictures with their phone and share their photos online by sharing photos on Flickr and using the hashtag #ElNinoCA or or share their drone maps within the DroneDeploy platform with tnc@dronedeploy.com by clicking the “Share” button. This collected data will be used by scientists who will make personal recommendations mitigating the risks and impacts of El Niño and climate change. An example of this might be advising the planting of vegetation in certain areas to prevent erosion where there is flooding. Public policy makers and government will use these recommendations to better adapt communities so they are more resilient and stable and to protect California’s coastline. 

 

Visit their website for more information at http://www.nature.org/?intc=nature.tnav

Written by Kathleen Emerson (2/9/2016)

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